Tuesday, October 26

Vaseline Glass Or Uranium Oxide Glass – Radioactive Glass That Glows in the Dark

Vaseline Glass Or Uranium Oxide Glass – Radioactive Glass That Glows in the Dark

VASELINE GLASS OR URANIUM GLASS

Uranium oxide glass is glass which has had uranium, usually in oxide diuranate form, added to a glass mix prior to melting. The proportion usually varies from trace levels to about 2% by weight uranium, although some 19th-century pieces were made with up to 25% uranium

Uranium oxide glass was once made into tableware and บาคาร่า  household items, but fell out of widespread use when the availability of uranium to most industries was sharply curtailed during the Cold War. Most such objects are now considered antiques or retro-era collectibles, although there has been a minor revival in art glassware. Otherwise, modern uranium glass is now mainly limited to small objects like beads or marbles as scientific or decorative novelties.

APPEARANCE OF VASELINE AND URANIUM GLASS

The normal color of uranium oxide glass ranges from yellow to green depending on the oxidation state and concentration of the metal ions, although this may be altered by the addition of other elements as glass colorants. Uranium glass also fluoresces bright green under ultraviolet light and can register above background radiation on a sufficiently sensitive geiger counter, although most pieces of uranium glass are considered to be harmless and only negligibly radioactive.

The most typical color of uranium glass is pale yellowish-green, which in the 1920s led to the nickname vaseline glass based on a perceived resemblance to the appearance of petroleum jelly as formulated and commercially sold at that time. Specialized collectors still define “vaseline glass” as transparent or semitransparent uranium glass in this specific color.

“Vaseline glass” is now frequently used as a synonym for any uranium glass, especially in the United States, but this usage is not universal. The term is sometimes carelessly applied to other types of glass based on certain aspects of their superficial appearance in normal light, regardless of actual uranium content which requires a blacklight test to verify the characteristic green fluorescence.

In England and Australia, the term “vaseline glass” can be used to refer to any type of translucent glass. Even within the United States, the “vaseline” description is sometimes applied to any type of translucent glass with a greasy surface lustre.

Several other common subtypes of uranium oxide glass have their own nicknames: custard glass (opaque or semiopaque pale yellow), jadite glass (opaque or semiopaque pale green; initially, the name was trademarked as “Jadite”, although this is sometimes overcorrected in modern usage to “jadeite”), and Depression glass (transparent or semitransparent pale green).

However, like “vaseline”, the terms “custard” and “jad(e)ite” are often applied on the basis of superficial appearance rather than uranium content. Similarly, Depression glass is also a general description for any piece of glassware manufactured during the Great Depression regardless of appearance or formula.

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